Tundra News

Focus Groups Confirm Eklipse™ Composites As Viable Home Siding Material Alternative

Vast majority of trade professionals in study recognize material’s performance benefits over vinyl and fiber cement

 

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE.

For more information contact:

Mike Deaner, Product Manager
mdeaner@TundraCompanies.com

 

St. Paul, Minn. — Tundra® Companies today released the findings of a 2016 research study evaluating the commercial viability of Tundra Eklipse™ composite materials for use in the manufacture of home siding.

Eklipse composites are strong, durable, lightweight, paintable and highly heat-resistant, making them suitable for a variety of potential end-uses, including siding. This performance is enabled by Tundra’s proprietary NanoKoat technology, which uniquely processes particles, polymers and coatings to elevate desired properties while controlling costs. Eklipse composites are delivered in a pelletized form that is ready for extrusion.

The focus group study, conducted by independent market research firm Opinion Dive, included four sessions in three markets: Charlotte, Boston and Minneapolis (two sessions). A total of 88 residential architects, builders and siding contractors participated in the sessions. All were chosen based on their industry expertise and were paid a fee for their time.

During the sessions, three siding samples were shown with product names withheld: a popular vinyl product, a popular fiber-cement product, and siding manufactured with Eklipse material. The group was asked a series of non-leading questions on perceived product aesthetics, performance and other key attributes.

Feedback was uniformly positive for the siding manufactured with Eklipse material, which compared favorably against both vinyl and fiber-cement siding in all key categories (download results PDF for more detail). In fact, 90 percent of the participants said they would purchase this siding today if it were available and offered at a price somewhere between the typical cost of vinyl and fiber cement.

“These were the highest focus group scores our company has ever seen for a new product,” said John Cashmore, Opinion Dive president and independent researcher. “I think the results show both that an unmet need exists in the home siding marketplace, and that the Eklipse material is capable of fulfilling that need.”

Common feedback for the siding made from Eklipse material was that it is lightweight and easy to install like vinyl, but with a higher-quality look and greater perceived resistance to impact, bending and breaking. Compared to fiber-cement siding, participants saw similar curb appeal, durability and strength, but remarked that it was a far less heavy and brittle product.

“We are obviously pleased with these results, because they confirm our conclusions that Eklipse material outperforms vinyl and fiber cement at an attractive price point,” said Tundra President and CEO Tom Kaiser. “We’re excited to help forward-thinking manufacturers extend a viable new siding option to residential architects, builders and siding contractors.”

About Tundra Companies

Founded in 2004 and based in St. Paul, Minnesota, USA, Tundra is a materials science company that develops new materials with enhanced performance characteristics for a wide variety of applications. A proprietary coating process uniquely controls the interaction of particles and polymers, resulting in high-value materials that are lighter or heavier, stronger, denser, safer or more flexible.

Tundra equips businesses with differentiating material performance characteristics that can replace existing materials, enable new solutions, open new market opportunities, improve cost efficiency and reduce environmental impact.

Tundra offers a variety of material platforms based on its proprietary coating technology, each of which is optimized with performance properties for specific applications and delivered as pelletized material that is ready for use in a variety of manufacturing processes. Those can include injection molding, blow molding, rotational molding, compression molding, extruding or 3D printing.